Unadilla Valley

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PO BOX F | 4238 State Highway 8
New Berlin, NY 13411
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Course Descriptions

College courses available at Unadilla Valley Central School
 
ARTS

Painting I-Fries
ART115 – 3 credit hours TC3
Painting I provides an introduction to the methods and techniques of various painting media. Principles of color, form, and composition are studied with an emphasis on experimentation. ART 115 fulfills the SUNY General Education requirement in the Arts.
 
Ceramics-Fries
ART130 – 3 credit hours TC3
This course provides an introduction to clay as a material that serves both expressive and functional purposes. Topics include various hand building techniques, demonstration (only) of the potter's wheel, the glazing and firing of projects, and an overview of the history of ceramics. ART 130 fulfills the SUNY General Education requirement in the Arts.



BUSINESS

Business Law I-DL (Ruffino)
BADM 223 – 3 credit hours SUNY Cobleskill
Students will develop an understanding of jurisprudence and its relationship to the role of the law in society as well as the system of jurisprudence in the US and how it operates. The course allows students to understand the role of criminal law in society and the legal rights and duties between individuals and society. Tort law, the formation of a contract, contractual agreement and considerations, contractual enforcement and relief from contractual obligations will be explored. Students will gain understanding of domestic and international sales and lease contracts, consumer protection, insurance law and the leasing of real property.



CAPS (Computer Application Programs)
 
Introduction to Word Processing-Muller
CAPS 111 – 1 credit hour Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is an introduction to the operation and uses of a word-processing program. Topics include inserting and modifying text, creating and modifying paragraphs, formatting documents, managing documents, working with graphics, and workgroup collaboration. Students will have access through UV to a computer while in class and an I-pad for out of class assignments using Word. Although each may participate in the course at any time during the day, there are strict deadlines as to when each assignment is due. This is not a self-paced course! The grade of assignments that are turned in late will be lowered at the instructor's discretion. 

Introduction to Spreadsheets-Muller
CAPS 121 - 1 credit hour Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course is an Introduction to the operation and uses of a spreadsheet program. topics covered parallel the objectives used for the Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) Core Exam in excel and include working with cell data, managing workbooks, formatting and printing worksheets, modifying workbooks, creating and revising formulas, creating and modifying graphics, and workgroup collaboration. Students are also required to read the on-line course documents and the various online readings, participate in on-line discussions, submit assignments and take tests. There are often brief activities within the on-line course documents that a student will work through as each learn new codes. Although each may participate in the course at any time during the day, there are strict deadlines as to when each assignment is due. This is not a self-paced course! The grade of assignments that are turned in late will be lowered at the instructor's discretion. 

Introduction to Databases-Muller
CAPS 131 - 1 credit hour Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is an introduction to the operation and uses of a database management program. The student will learn how to create and manipulate a simple relational database using Access. Topics include creating and modifying tables, addition of and modification of data in tables, using queries to view data in one or more tables, use of forms to view and update tables, and creation of simple reports including mailing labels. Students are also required to read the on-line course documents and the various online readings, participate in on-line discussions, submit assignments and take tests. There are often brief activities within the on-line course documents that a student will work through as each learn new codes. Although each may participate in the course at any time during the day, there are strict deadlines as to when each assignment is due. This is not a self-paced course! The grade of assignments that are turned in late will be lowered at the instructor's discretion. 

Introduction to Web Design-Muller
CAPS 152 - 1 credit hour Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is a course that will teach students how to design Web pages using the XML version of HyperText  Markup Language (HTML). This version of the code is called XHTML. The backbone of the course will be a small web site that each will develop and set up on the Unadilla Valley Server. The development will be done in stages that will correspond to each topic of the course. The completion of the web site will compose the Final Project of the course. As various types of code is learned, you will add new features to your site, building your project as the course proceeds. It is not acceptable to submit your Final Project without developing it in this step-by-step manner! Although each may participate in the course at any time during the day, there are strict deadlines as to when each assignment is due. This is not a self-paced course! The grade of assignments that are turned in late will be lowered at the instructor's discretion. 



EDUCATION

Foundations of Education-Wolford
EDUC 106 – 3 credit hours State University of New York - Oneonta
The course provides introduction to several fundamental education issues facing society as well as look at the philosophical, historical, political, sociological, and ethical bases of American B-12 schools. Specific goals for students include understanding and using some of humanity’s most important and challenging ideas, developing good academic skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening), and learning about the values and rigors of academic discipline including portfolio development. In particular, students will examine educational issues and beginning development of educational professional skills with strong emphasis on writing.



ENGINEERING

IED- Introduction to Engineering Design (DDPII Engineering)-Rexroat
3 credit hours Rochester Institute of Technology
You will learn the basics of computer-assisted drafting and design using Inventor.  The purpose of this course is to study the "language of the engineer." The course will allow you to practice the basic principles and standards of mechanical drafting. You will use drafting skills, creative thinking, decision-making, problem solving skills and graphic techniques to solve design problems. This course is recommended for students who have an interest in exploring and possibly becoming engineers, technicians, or one of the many types of designers. (Must earn, at minimum, an 85% and score 6 out of 9 on the college exam to earn credit.)

POE- Principles of Engineering-Rexroat
3 credit hours Rochester Institute of Technology
Using math, science, and technology, students will be exploring the career of Engineering. Through problem-based learning they will explore the process that engineers work through on a daily basis. The course will focus on four major concepts: Energy and Power, Materials and Structures, Control Systems, and Kinematics. (Must earn, at minimum, an 85% and score 6 out of 9 on the college exam to earn credit.)

CEA- Civil Engineering and Architecture -Rexroat
3 credit hours Rochester Institute of Technology
New building plans look impressive onscreen, but how would that cool structural design you developed stand up to a flood, earthquake, city inspector, or historical commission? Some of today's designs integrate housing, workspace, recreation, and the great outdoors into the same building or complex. Use 3D modeling software to create and test your own residential and commercial designs, factoring in: Materials and systems; Structural design; Cost/efficiency analysis; Storm water management; Site design / considerations; Utilities and services; Building codes; Architectural style and guidelines. Research the professional and technical careers in the design and construction industry, including those addressing new developments in energy efficiency, green technologies, and changing populations. (Must earn, at minimum, an 85% and score 6 out of 9 on the college exam to earn credit.)



ENGLISH

Academic Writing I-Crandall
ENGL 100 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is the first of a two-course sequence of academic writing. Students learn how to write a variety of essays, usually in response to readings. They review grammar and basic writing skills, learn an effective writing process, begin to engage and respond to academic texts, and are introduced to research and documentation of sources appropriate for introductory-level college essays. Special sections may center on a theme. 
(ENGL 100 fulfills the SUNY General Education Basic Communication Requirement.)

Academic Writing II-Crandall
ENGL 101 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course develops and refines student writing in an academic context. Students engage and respond to challenging texts as they develop critical thinking skills. They learn to support their ideas with credible, authoritative information from academic sources and to recognize audience, purpose, and bias. Special sections may center on a theme.
Prerequisites: successful completion of ENGL 100 or appropriate assessment; prior completion or concurrent enrollment in RDNG 116 if required by placement testing.

Introduction to Speech-Crandall
COMM 111 – 3 credit hours State University of New York – Morrisville
Speech as communication. Composition and delivery of informative and persuasive speeches. Practice in addressing a group in order to develop confidence and proficiency necessary throughout college and life beyond. Lecture, discussion and presentation of learned techniques and ideas.



FOREIGN LANGUAGE
 
Intermediate Spanish/Spanish IV -Dorosky
SPAN 201 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
Spanish IV is intended for students who have successfully completed Spanish III. This course provides a substantial review of the basics while expanding students’ knowledge of vocabulary, structure and functions to allow them to express themselves in a more varied and meaningful way, both orally and in writing. As in the previous levels, students have ample opportunity for interaction during class. Culture is also explored. Reading is emphasized to a greater degree than in previous levels. 
Prerequisite: successful completion of Spanish III.

Intermediate French/French IV-
FREN 201 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course provides a substantial review of the basics while expanding students’ knowledge of vocabulary, structure and functions to allow them to express themselves in a more varied and meaningful way, both orally and in writing. As in the previous levels, students have ample opportunity for interaction in class. Culture is also explored. Reading is emphasized to a greater degree than in previous levels. 
Prerequisite: successful completion of French III.

American Sign Language I -Gaccione
AMSL 101 – 3 credit hours State University of New York – Morrisville
This is an introductory course for students in American Sign Language with basic vocabulary, structure, syntax and grammar. Conversational skills will be emphasized from an expressive and receptive perspective, as well as the manual alphabet, numbers, colors and facial grammar. Exposure to Deaf Culture and culturally appropriate behaviors will be included in the course. This course satisfies the Liberal Arts and Sciences requirement and the SUNY General Education Requirement for Foreign Language.



HEALTH AND FITNESS
 
First Aid and Safety-Acevedo
HLTH205 – 3 credit hours TC3
This is a study of the typical injuries, illnesses, and emergency situations received in workplace, recreation, home and community, as well as the corresponding first aid skills needed to manage those emergencies until Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel arrive. This course emphasizes ways to prevent such scenarios and helps students confront their fears of stepping forward to provide assistance. The corresponding American Red Cross certificate(s) in CPR and First Aid are awarded for additional fee upon satisfactory completion of the requirements.

Lifeguard Training-Acevedo
FITN216 – 2 credit hours TC3
Lifeguard Training prepares individuals to assume more effectively the duties and responsibilities of lifeguards. It covers equipment-based rescues, spinal injury management, post-rescue care and many other topics based on up-to-date principles of aquatic safety. First aid and professional rescuer level CPR training are also included. The Waterfront Life Guarding module covers skills and knowledge needed at the waterfront. American Red Cross (or similar) certifications available for an additional fee. Prerequisites: FITN 102 or Red Cross level 5 or 6 skills with permission of the instructor; 15 yrs. of age or older, and successful completion of a pretest.

 Personal Health-Johnson
HLTH 206- 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course covers some of the most perplexing health-related problems, and provides opinions, data and facts to help students make decisions to optimize their personal health. Topics include promoting health behavior change, psychological health, managing stress, violence and abuse, human sexuality, nutrition, weight management, personal fitness, addiction and addictive behaviors, alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine, illicit drugs, cardiovascular disease, cancer, infectious diseases, noninfectious conditions, healthy aging, environmental health, consumerism and complementary and alternative medicine.



HISTORY
 
History 201-Loeffler
HSTY 201 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course will trace the development of America politically, economically, and culturally from the time of early European contact with the native populations through the end of Reconstruction in 1877.  Areas of focus will include the creation of the American republic, presidential leadership, westward expansion, slavery and sectionalism, development of democratic ideals, early reform movements, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.  Emphasis will be placed on critical analysis of primary source materials, and evaluation of perspectives to better understand change over time.
 
History 202-Loeffler
HSTY 202 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course analyzes problems faced by the American people since the end of Reconstruction. Issues include the effects of industrialization, social, economic and political reform, imperialism, immigration, urbanization, populism, progressivism, the transformation from isolationism to a position of world power, the New Deal, World War I, World War II, the Cold War, revival of feminism and racism.
Prerequisite: successful completion of History 201



HUMANITIES
 
Introduction to Psychology-DL (Wolford/Ruffino)
PSYC 100 – 3 credit hours Hudson Valley Community College (DL)
This course provides students with a basic understanding of psychology. Theories and research relating to emotions and stress, abnormal behavior, motivation, learning, personality, methods of therapy, biology and behaviors, developmental psychology, and social psychology are discussed.
 
Introduction to Psychology-Coddington
PSYC 101 – 3 credit hours SUNY Morrisville
This course provides students with a basic understanding of psychology. Theories and research relating to emotions and stress, abnormal behavior, motivation, learning, personality, methods of therapy, biology and behaviors, developmental psychology, and social psychology are discussed.
 
Introduction to Sociology-DL (Wolford/Ruffino)
SOCL 100 – 3 credit hours Hudson Valley Community College (DL)
An introduction to scientific study of human social interactions with an emphasis on societies, group, organizations, social networks and communities as the units of analysis.  Topics covered include culture, social structure, socialization, sex roles, groups and networks, organizations, deviance and social control, inequality and social stratification, race and ethnic relations and social institutions.
 
Introduction to the College Experience-LaValley/Perdersen
ACAD 100 – 1 credit hour Tompkins Cortland Community College
Promotes students' personal adjustment and academic success in their first college semester. Topics include adjusting to college, developing essential learning and time management strategies, and learning about college resources. This course is appropriate for new college students in all programs. Because of the similarity of the course content, students may not receive credit for both ACAD 100 and ACAD 150 toward their degree. 
Prerequisites: Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 099 and RDNG 099 if required by placement testing.



MATH
 
College Algebra: Fenton
MATH 120 - 4 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course covers college algebra between beginning algebra and pre-calculus. Topics include linear, quadratic, absolute value, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic expressions/equations/functions, function notation, graphing functions, transformations of functions, inverses, complex numbers, and linear, absolute value, and quadratic inequalities. Fulfills the SUNY General Education Mathematics requirement. A graphing calculator (TI-84+ or higher) is required.
Prerequisite: successful completion of Geometry I
 
Pre-calculus: Fenton
MATH 138 - 4 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
AMAT 100 - 3 credit hours State University of New York - Albany
Pre-calculus provides the algebraic foundation, from a function standpoint, for a standard calculus course. Topics include polynomial functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications, right triangle trigonometry, analytic trigonometry, and trigonometry with applications including law of sines and law of cosines, vectors, polar coordinates, binomial theorem and conic sections. Fulfills the SUNY General Education Mathematics requirement. A graphing calculator (TI-84+ or higher) is required.
Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra II CC
 
Calculus I: Fenton
MATH 201 - 4 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
AMAT 112 - 4 credit hours State University of New York - Albany
This is a first course in calculus for all disciplines. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives and anti-derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions, and the definite integral. Applications including curve sketching, optimization problems, related rates, area under and between curves, and volumes of revolution. Fulfills the SUNY General Education Mathematics requirement. A graphing calculator (TI-84+ or higher) is required.
Prerequisite: successful completion of Pre-calculus

Elementary Statistics: Fenton
MATH 200 - 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
AMAT 108 - 3 credit hours State University of New York - Albany
A study of the application of statistical procedures to the analysis of experimental data. Topics covered include methods of presentation of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, sampling techniques, elementary probability, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals on both one and two populations, and linear regression and correlation. Use of the binomial, the normal, the student’s T, and the chi-square distributions are covered. Fulfills the SUNY General Education Mathematics requirement. A graphing calculator (TI-84+ or higher) is required.
Prerequisite: successful completion of Geometry I



MUSIC
 
Music of the World’s Cultures/Music Appreciation-DuVall
MUSI 108 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course is designed to give you a basic understanding of the varieties of music of the world.  We will approach this task by listening to and reading about different musical cultures, by performing their music in class, and by analyzing what we see and hear.  As we explore musical cultures we will ask the following questions:
What are the typical stylistic elements used?
What kinds of singing and what kinds of instruments are used?
What are the uses of music in this culture and how is culture affected by music?
What is the belief system about music in this culture?
How does music reflect this particular culture, its people, and their values?
 
Music Theory-DuVall
MUSI 101 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course is a basic introduction to music fundamentals. Students learn notation, rhythmic patterns, melodic patterns, and harmonic progressions. Analysis of musical textures and forms, ear training, sight reading and composition are included.



SCIENCE (AGRICULTURAL)
 
Contemporary Issues in Life Science I – Biotechnology-Jackson
ACAS 100 – 3 credit hours State University of New York - Albany
This course provides an introduction to biotechnology and its application in a variety of medical, food, clinical, and forensic science disciplines. Topics covered include basic instrumentation, microbiology techniques, DNA and protein separation techniques, gel electrophoresis, PCR, recombinant DNA technology, spectrophotometry, chromatography, and centrifugation techniques. Emphasis is placed on basic laboratory techniques to study cell structure and function, microbiology, DNA, biochemistry, and genetically modified organisms and bioethics. We will also participate in the “Hellbender Salamander Project” with the Upper Susquehanna Coalition. Prerequisite: a minimum of one year of Regents Biology.
 
Agricultural Food and Natural Science-DeVries
AGSC 131 – 3 credit hours State University of New York – Cobleskill
AGBU 100 – 6 credit hours Alfred University
Agri-science is an introduction to the broad field of agriculture. The course includes the following topics: Agri-science and Biotechnology, Career Experience and Leadership in Agri-science, Soils and Hydroponic Management, Integrated Pest Management, Plant Sciences, Animal Sciences, and Food Science and Technology. Also included is an introduction to the FFA. Students will be able to take skills learned in this course and apply them to future goals.
 
Agricultural Mechanical Science-DeVries
AGBN 103 – 3 credit hours State University of New York - Cobleskill
The student will earn a basic understanding of the skills needed by today’s agricultural engineers and mechanics. Students learn basic skills in woodworking and metalworking, power tools, project planning, gas heating and cutting, arc welding, small gas engines, and ag structures. Students will utilize their skills in “hands-on” applications where they will design and build projects and learn safe machine shop management. The student will also have the opportunity to participate in field trips where they can compete in career development events at colleges and fairs.

Animal Science-Devries
ANSC 100 – 3 credit hours State University of New York – Morrisville
ANSC 111 – 3 credit hours State University of New York - Cobleskill
The study of animal reproduction, nutrition, health and management. Students learn how an animal’s body works to utilize feeds and grow healthy. The human effect on the animal industry locally and globally is also covered. Field trips and many career development events will enable students to do “hands-on” work and become future leaders in the field of animal science. 
 
Horticulture Practices II-DeVries
HORT210 – 2 credit hours SUNY Morrisville
An ongoing series of courses designed to engage students in a wide range of horticulture practices. These practices include methods acceptable by both commercial and research sectors of the Green Industry. This is a sophomore level course that continues to introduce students to the basics while adding advanced production skills and technology. The level of the students’ crop and entrepreneurial responsibilities will also increase.
 
Introduction to Environmental Science-DeVries
ENSC 100 – 3 credit hours State University of New York – Morrisville
ENVS 101 – 6 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course is recommended for the student who wishes to become a conservation officer, environmental conservationist, ecologist, or other environmentally related field. Students are introduced to topics such as: ecological systems, water, air, atmosphere & climate, land, food, biodiversity, energy, waste, population growth, and how humans affect the environment. 
 
Introduction to Food Science and Safety-DeVries
CAHT 105 – 3 credit hours State University of New York - Cobleskill
Students will complete hands-on activities, projects, and problems that simulate actual concepts and situations found in the food science and safety industry, allowing students to build content knowledge and technical skills. Students will investigate areas of food science including food safety, food chemistry, food processing, food product development, and marketing. Research and experimental design will be highlighted as students develop and conduct industry appropriate investigations.

Food Systems I: Introduction to US Food Systems-DeVries
ENVS110 – 2 credit hours TC3
This seminar course will introduce students to the food system concept, and explore the sustainability of the U.S. food system. Topics covered will include: the history of food and agriculture; environmental impacts of food systems; production agriculture in the U.S. and sustainable alternatives; food processing, distribution, and waste; food and health, food security in the U.S.; and local food systems.

Food Systems Seminar: Food Movements-DeVries
ENVS111 – 2 credit hours TC3
This seminar course will explore the role of social movements in challenging the dominant food production and distribution system, and in building sustainable alternatives.
 
Introduction to Veterinary Science/Animal Techniques-DeVries
VETS 120 – 2 credit hours State University of New York – Delhi
Students are introduced to medical terminology, the role of the veterinary technician in the veterinary field, career options, ethics, laws, safety and public health issues as they relate to veterinary medicine.



SCIENCE

Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology-Jackson
BIOL 131 – 4 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This course is an introduction to human anatomy and physiology. Students are introduced to the basic organization of the human body, basic biochemistry involved in physiological interactions, basics of tissue organization, and histology. In addition, the course surveys the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems of the human body. BIOL 131 fulfills the SUNY General Education Natural Sciences requirement.
Prerequisites: Recent (within the last five years) NYS Regents exam in biology and chemistry (passed with an 80% grade or better) or BIOL 104 or CHEM 101 and BIOL 101. Prior completion or concurrent enrollment in MATH 095, RDNG 116, and ENGL 100 if required by placement testing.

Principles of Biology I-Jackson
BIOL 101 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is a study of the basic principles of biology. Course topics include chemistry as it relates to organisms, cell anatomy and physiology and genetics. There is a heavy emphasis placed upon the utilization of the scientific method throughout the course as it applies to each concept. The course is intended to be an introductory course for all students who will enroll in future college-level science classes.
Prerequisites: MATH 095 and RDNG 099 if required by placement testing; ENGL 099 or prior completion or concurrent enrollment in ESL 103 if required by placement testing.
 
Principles of Biology II-Jackson
BIOL 102 – 3 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is a study of the basic principles of biology. Course topics include evolution, biodiversity vertebrate anatomy and physiology and ecology. The overall goal of this course is to develop an understanding of these topics and how science helps us make everyday decisions. The course is intended to be an introductory course for all students who will enroll in future college-level science classes.
 
Principles of Chemistry I -Wolford
CHEM 101- 4 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is a study of the basic principles of chemistry including measurement, atomic structure, bonding, mole concept, stoichiometry, and chemical formulas, equations solutions. It is intended for students who have not had a chemistry course. Quantitative laboratory experiments are performed utilizing fundamental principles studied in the course. Substantial outside preparation for the laboratories is required.
 
Principles of Chemistry II -Wolford
CHEM 102- 4 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is a study of the basic principles of chemistry including equilibrium, acids and bases, redox, states of matter, and organic chemistry. It is intended for students who have not had a chemistry course. Quantitative laboratory experiments are performed utilizing fundamental principles studied in the course. Substantial outside preparation for the laboratories is required.
Prerequisite: successful completion of Chemistry 101

General Physics I -Wolford
PHSC 104- 4 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is the first half of a two-course sequence. Topics include motion, statics, dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotation. In the laboratory sessions, error analysis and graphical analysis are emphasized. The course is intended for those with an interest in physics and without a background in calculus. A scientific calculator is required. PHSC 104 fulfills the SUNY General Education Natural Sciences requirement.
 
General Physics II -Wolford
PHSC 105- 4 credit hours Tompkins Cortland Community College
This is the second half of a two-course sequence. Topics include electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, optics, relativity, quantum physics, atomic, nuclear and elementary particle theories. In the laboratory sessions, error analysis and graphical analysis are emphasized. The course is intended for those with an interest in physics and without a background in calculus. A scientific calculator is required.
Prerequisite: successful completion of Physics 104